Serving the Millennial Client

Serving the Millennial Client Millennials are the largest living generation in the U.S. and currently make up 1/3rd of the workforce. As more millennials enter the workforce, their need for attorneys will increase. As their need for attorneys increases, attorneys will be faced with difficult task of adapting to a clientele who are drastically different from the previous generations. There are two primary differences an attorney will need to address in serving the millennial client: the millennial DIY mind frame and the millennial’s preference for technology. As Casey C. Sullivan put it in “How to Win Millennial Clients,” Millennials are Continue Reading…

Alimony Concerns for Stay at Home Parents

Stay-at-home parenting is becoming rarer by the day. Bureau of Labor statistics show that, “In 1967, 49 percent of mothers were stay-at-home mothers. That proportion steadily dropped through the decades until 1999, when only 23 percent of moms stayed at home,” according to the Bureau of Labor article, “Stay at Home Mothers through the years”. We expect with Millennials and beyond, that rate may drop even lower. Regardless of the statistics, there are thousands of parents opting to stay home with the kids. Consider the following scenario… A couple meets. Both are competent, educated, and employed. They fall in everlasting Continue Reading…

Attorney Stereotype Not Accurate

There are few professions more vilified than that of the divorce attorney (except maybe used car salesman.) Insulting lawyers is practically a sport. We hear lawyer jokes in line at the grocery store. There are comics and Facebook pages designed to malign attorneys. The interesting dichotomy is that if you listen to our clients, you hear exactly the opposite – that we were there for them during one of the hardest times of their lives. We supported them. Answered their questions. Advocated for them in the courtroom and genuinely cared about them. We gave them their best chance at moving Continue Reading…

After Divorce: College Funding Responsibility

Who’s responsible for college funding post divorce? Although child support payments typically end when children turn 18, divorcing couples often agree to college funding as part of their settlement.  There are many considerations to discuss with your family law attorney regarding paying for college after divorce. The first place to start is whether the supporting party will be paying for college and, if so, how much. “For some divorcing couples, the answer is uncomplicated.  Money has been earmarked for college, Johnny’s interests come first, everybody can agree on who will pay what,” writes Jeffrey A. Landers in his article “One Continue Reading…

Gender Expansive Youth May Face Potential Legal Issues

Gender Expansive Youth Legal Matters An interesting article in the Michigan Bar Journal, December 2017 edition titled “Legal Issues Facing Transgender and Gender Expansive Youth,” by Angie Martell brings to light many current and potential legal considerations for children and teens. The article reads, “Transgender and gender-expansive individuals face more and more hidden barriers and injustices. Is the strict adherence to a two- sex paradigm not only inconsistent with science but discriminatory?” Family Law Attorney Kathryn Wayne-Spindler has been practicing in Michigan for more than 20 years and finds many of the article’s topics fascinating and pertinent. “So many legal issues Continue Reading…

Mid-Michigan Divorce Lawyer

Kathryn Wayne-Spindler now representing new Divorce clients in four Mid-Michigan counties Mid-Michigan Divorce Lawyer has more than two decades of Michigan divorce experience Experienced Michigan Divorce Lawyer Kathryn Wayne-Spindler has added new counties to her practice area. She is now accepting new divorce clients in Clare, Gladwin, Ogemaw and Roscommon counties. She has been successfully practicing family law in Southeastern Michigan for more than 20 years. For representation in a new divorce matter, contact the law office of Kathryn Wayne-Spindler & Associates at 248-676-1000.

Silent Marriage Killer: Undiagnosed Mental Illness

This blog about marriage with a spouse who has undiagnosed mental illness is part two in a three-part series on Functionality and Marriage. We discussed functional alcoholism in the first part. Check out the blog “Silent Marriage Killer: The Functional Alcoholic” if you missed it. In the blog about functional alcoholism, we used the pronoun “he” when referring to the drinker and “she” for the spouse. Since this blog references postpartum depression that primarily impacts women, we’ll refer to the afflicted person as “she” and the spouse as “he.” We also recognize that using gender-specific pronouns is not inclusive to the broad Continue Reading…

Silent Marriage Killer: The Functional Alcoholic

This is part one of a three-part series of blogs about some of the common causes of divorce. For the purposes of this blog about marriage to the functional alcoholic, we’ll refer to the drinker as “he” and the spouse as “she” or “the spouse”. We fully realize that although in the past more functional alcoholics were men, research shows the gender gap is closing. So we recognize that the drinking spouse in this scenario is almost as likely to be a woman, but for the sake of editorial clarity, please forgive the gender-specific pronouns.  In our busy Michigan law Continue Reading…

Grandparent Rights: Three Standards

We field many calls in our busy family law practice about grandparent rights. Some want to know if they can collect child support payments if they are helping raise their grandkids. Some grandparents want to know the options if they disapprove of parents’ decisions. Others wonder how to protect their relationship with the grandchildren after the parents divorce. The possible scenarios are so varied it’s difficult to address them all in one blog but there are three standards that Michigan courts take into account when considering a grandparent rights case. For more detailed information about specific cases, contact the Law Continue Reading…

Divorce Decision

Arriving at a divorce decision from an alcoholic or mentally ill spouse can be complex, emotional and ongoing but separating can be a relief in the long run. This is the third part of a three-part series on causes of divorce and the divorce decision. We discussed functional alcoholism in the first part and undiagnosed mental illness in the second. This third blog addresses the divorce decision from an alcoholic or someone with mental illness. Divorce Decision is Complex Every plaintiff in every divorce has a last straw. That moment when they realize their health or sanity is at risk if they Continue Reading…